The Lost Generation

Never send to know for whom the bell tolls

World War I in Photos: Introduction

Going to the movies in the ’30sPhotos from Kentucky Digital Library Going to the movies in the ’30sPhotos from Kentucky Digital Library Going to the movies in the ’30sPhotos from Kentucky Digital Library Going to the movies in the ’30sPhotos from Kentucky Digital Library

Going to the movies in the ’30s

Photos from Kentucky Digital Library

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3 months ago

latimes:

First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt in the pages of the L.A. Times shortly after her husband’s inauguration, courtesy of our history Tumblr.
latimespast:

Eleanor Roosevelt, then the brand-new first lady, walked to church by herself, “shattering another precedent,” on March 12, 1933. This item was published in the L.A. Times the following day. (Her husband had just been sworn in earlier that month, on March 4.)

More from our archives: Here’s Mrs. Roosevelt five years later, during a tour of government relief activities in L.A., and back in L.A. for the 1960 Democratic National Convention in 1960.

latimes:

First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt in the pages of the L.A. Times shortly after her husband’s inauguration, courtesy of our history Tumblr.

latimespast:

Eleanor Roosevelt, then the brand-new first lady, walked to church by herself, “shattering another precedent,” on March 12, 1933. This item was published in the L.A. Times the following day. (Her husband had just been sworn in earlier that month, on March 4.)

More from our archives: Here’s Mrs. Roosevelt five years later, during a tour of government relief activities in L.A., and back in L.A. for the 1960 Democratic National Convention in 1960.

Strike!
From Wayne State University’s Walter P. Reuther Library Strike!
From Wayne State University’s Walter P. Reuther Library

Strike!

From Wayne State University’s Walter P. Reuther Library

Artists come together to commemorate centenary of outbreak of first world war

todaysdocument:

More photos of the aftermath of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire from our holdings, via the digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:
digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

On March 25, 1911, a match was dropped and a factory exploded with fire, resulting in one of the highest losses of life from an industrial accident in the US. 146 people—mostly women—were burned alive, succumbed to smoke inhalation, or were forced to jump from the eighth, ninth, and tenth stories of the Asche Building* in New York City. Factory owners had locked the doors to stairwells and fire escapes to stop the women from taking unauthorized breaks and to stem the theft of the materials and products from the factory floor.
The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire, which led to legislation to improve industrial safety standards for workers and the founding of the American Society of Safety Engineers, remains a stark reminder of the harsh conditions under which workers, including women and children, were forced to toil before workplace safety initiatives were widely employed in the US. Read more at pbs.org.
The two images above depict a view of the Asche Building interior after the fire and a demonstration of protest and mourning held several weeks after the fire.
See the entire set of powerful images from the National Archives and Records Administration collection here.
*Now the Brown Building, a part of the campus of New York University (NYU). It is located at 23-29 Washington Place, between Greene Street and Washington Square East in Greenwich Village, New York City. More.

todaysdocument:

More photos of the aftermath of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire from our holdings, via the digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:
digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

On March 25, 1911, a match was dropped and a factory exploded with fire, resulting in one of the highest losses of life from an industrial accident in the US. 146 people—mostly women—were burned alive, succumbed to smoke inhalation, or were forced to jump from the eighth, ninth, and tenth stories of the Asche Building* in New York City. Factory owners had locked the doors to stairwells and fire escapes to stop the women from taking unauthorized breaks and to stem the theft of the materials and products from the factory floor.
The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire, which led to legislation to improve industrial safety standards for workers and the founding of the American Society of Safety Engineers, remains a stark reminder of the harsh conditions under which workers, including women and children, were forced to toil before workplace safety initiatives were widely employed in the US. Read more at pbs.org.
The two images above depict a view of the Asche Building interior after the fire and a demonstration of protest and mourning held several weeks after the fire.
See the entire set of powerful images from the National Archives and Records Administration collection here.
*Now the Brown Building, a part of the campus of New York University (NYU). It is located at 23-29 Washington Place, between Greene Street and Washington Square East in Greenwich Village, New York City. More.

todaysdocument:

More photos of the aftermath of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire from our holdings, via the digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

On March 25, 1911, a match was dropped and a factory exploded with fire, resulting in one of the highest losses of life from an industrial accident in the US. 146 people—mostly women—were burned alive, succumbed to smoke inhalation, or were forced to jump from the eighth, ninth, and tenth stories of the Asche Building* in New York City. Factory owners had locked the doors to stairwells and fire escapes to stop the women from taking unauthorized breaks and to stem the theft of the materials and products from the factory floor.

The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire, which led to legislation to improve industrial safety standards for workers and the founding of the American Society of Safety Engineers, remains a stark reminder of the harsh conditions under which workers, including women and children, were forced to toil before workplace safety initiatives were widely employed in the US. Read more at pbs.org.

The two images above depict a view of the Asche Building interior after the fire and a demonstration of protest and mourning held several weeks after the fire.

See the entire set of powerful images from the National Archives and Records Administration collection here.

*Now the Brown Building, a part of the campus of New York University (NYU). It is located at 23-29 Washington Place, between Greene Street and Washington Square East in Greenwich Village, New York City. More.

todaysdocument:

Robert Frost: March 26, 1874 - January 29, 1963
Born 140 years ago today, iconic American poet Robert Frost’s World War I draft registration card is among the featured items at the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures" exhibit now on display at the National Archives Museum.

World War I Draft Registration Card for Robert Frost;From the series: Draft Registration Cards, 1917 - 1918
Robert Frost Poster;From the series: Propaganda Posters Distributed in Asia, Latin America and the Middle East, ca. 1950 - ca. 1965


(H/T to queenslibrary for the reminder!)
todaysdocument:

Robert Frost: March 26, 1874 - January 29, 1963
Born 140 years ago today, iconic American poet Robert Frost’s World War I draft registration card is among the featured items at the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures" exhibit now on display at the National Archives Museum.

World War I Draft Registration Card for Robert Frost;From the series: Draft Registration Cards, 1917 - 1918
Robert Frost Poster;From the series: Propaganda Posters Distributed in Asia, Latin America and the Middle East, ca. 1950 - ca. 1965


(H/T to queenslibrary for the reminder!)

todaysdocument:

Robert Frost: March 26, 1874 - January 29, 1963

Born 140 years ago today, iconic American poet Robert Frost’s World War I draft registration card is among the featured items at the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures" exhibit now on display at the National Archives Museum.

World War I Draft Registration Card for Robert Frost;
From the series: Draft Registration Cards, 1917 - 1918

Robert Frost Poster;
From the series: Propaganda Posters Distributed in Asia, Latin America and the Middle East, ca. 1950 - ca. 1965

(H/T to queenslibrary for the reminder!)

Today’s Document from the National Archives
Recommissioned on March 20, 1922, the USS Langley was the United States Navy’s first aircraft carrier.

Today’s Document from the National Archives

Recommissioned on March 20, 1922, the USS Langley was the United States Navy’s first aircraft carrier.

Second batch of First World War unit diaries goes online | The National Archives

The Roaring Twenties- An Interactive Exploration of the Historical Soundscape of New York City


Thanks to a project by Emily Thompson and Scott Mahoy you can browse experience the sights and sounds of New York City cross-referenced by sound, space and time.

Anyone up for a little time travel?

An Opium Den, Chinatown, San Francisco, California, turn of the century

An Opium Den, Chinatown, San Francisco, California, turn of the century

Old Time Farm Crime: The Hooch Farmers of Templeton - Modern Farmer

todaysdocument:

Cheers, Prohibition Ends!
Eighty years ago on December 5, 1933, the 21st Amendment was ratified, as announced in this proclamation from President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The 21st Amendment repealed the 18th Amendment of January 16, 1919, ending the increasingly unpopular nationwide prohibition of alcohol.
todaysdocument:

Cheers, Prohibition Ends!
Eighty years ago on December 5, 1933, the 21st Amendment was ratified, as announced in this proclamation from President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The 21st Amendment repealed the 18th Amendment of January 16, 1919, ending the increasingly unpopular nationwide prohibition of alcohol.
todaysdocument:

Cheers, Prohibition Ends!
Eighty years ago on December 5, 1933, the 21st Amendment was ratified, as announced in this proclamation from President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The 21st Amendment repealed the 18th Amendment of January 16, 1919, ending the increasingly unpopular nationwide prohibition of alcohol.
todaysdocument:

Cheers, Prohibition Ends!
Eighty years ago on December 5, 1933, the 21st Amendment was ratified, as announced in this proclamation from President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The 21st Amendment repealed the 18th Amendment of January 16, 1919, ending the increasingly unpopular nationwide prohibition of alcohol.
todaysdocument:

Cheers, Prohibition Ends!
Eighty years ago on December 5, 1933, the 21st Amendment was ratified, as announced in this proclamation from President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The 21st Amendment repealed the 18th Amendment of January 16, 1919, ending the increasingly unpopular nationwide prohibition of alcohol.
todaysdocument:

Cheers, Prohibition Ends!
Eighty years ago on December 5, 1933, the 21st Amendment was ratified, as announced in this proclamation from President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The 21st Amendment repealed the 18th Amendment of January 16, 1919, ending the increasingly unpopular nationwide prohibition of alcohol.

todaysdocument:

Cheers, Prohibition Ends!

Eighty years ago on December 5, 1933, the 21st Amendment was ratified, as announced in this proclamation from President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The 21st Amendment repealed the 18th Amendment of January 16, 1919, ending the increasingly unpopular nationwide prohibition of alcohol.

"The 1920 Wonder Team-described as the greatest college football team of all time, was undefeated in 5 years. This 1920 team, coached by Andy Smith, scored 510 points for the season against 14 for its opponents and climaxed its record with a 28-0 victory over Ohio State in the [1921] Rose Bowl.”
From the Online Archive of California

"The 1920 Wonder Team-described as the greatest college football team of all time, was undefeated in 5 years. This 1920 team, coached by Andy Smith, scored 510 points for the season against 14 for its opponents and climaxed its record with a 28-0 victory over Ohio State in the [1921] Rose Bowl.”

From the Online Archive of California

Library of Congress: 75% of Silent Films Lost