The Lost Generation

Never send to know for whom the bell tolls

Top Photo: Norma Lawrence is 10 years old and picks from 100 to 150 pounds of cotton a day. Drags the sack which often hold 50 pounds or more before emptied.
Bottom Photo: Callie Campbell, 11 years old, picks 75 to 125 pounds of cotton a day, and totes 50 pounds of it when sack gets full. “No, I don’t like it very much.”
Photos by Lewis W Hine 1916
In 1913 states like Georgia had labor laws that allowed children under the age of 13 to work as many 66 hours a week. In 1916 Congress passed the Keating-Owen Act to curtail these practices. The bill received major opposition from southern states like North Carolina, South Carolina, Mississippi, Alabama, and, of course, Georgia. Top Photo: Norma Lawrence is 10 years old and picks from 100 to 150 pounds of cotton a day. Drags the sack which often hold 50 pounds or more before emptied.
Bottom Photo: Callie Campbell, 11 years old, picks 75 to 125 pounds of cotton a day, and totes 50 pounds of it when sack gets full. “No, I don’t like it very much.”
Photos by Lewis W Hine 1916
In 1913 states like Georgia had labor laws that allowed children under the age of 13 to work as many 66 hours a week. In 1916 Congress passed the Keating-Owen Act to curtail these practices. The bill received major opposition from southern states like North Carolina, South Carolina, Mississippi, Alabama, and, of course, Georgia.

Top Photo: Norma Lawrence is 10 years old and picks from 100 to 150 pounds of cotton a day. Drags the sack which often hold 50 pounds or more before emptied.

Bottom Photo: Callie Campbell, 11 years old, picks 75 to 125 pounds of cotton a day, and totes 50 pounds of it when sack gets full. “No, I don’t like it very much.”

Photos by Lewis W Hine 1916

In 1913 states like Georgia had labor laws that allowed children under the age of 13 to work as many 66 hours a week. In 1916 Congress passed the Keating-Owen Act to curtail these practices. The bill received major opposition from southern states like North Carolina, South Carolina, Mississippi, Alabama, and, of course, Georgia.

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